Last edited by Faunos
Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

2 edition of Disaster recovery after Hurricane Hugo in South Carolina found in the catalog.

Disaster recovery after Hurricane Hugo in South Carolina

Claire B. Rubin

Disaster recovery after Hurricane Hugo in South Carolina

by Claire B. Rubin

  • 244 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by Natural Hazards Research and Applications Information Center, Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado in [Boulder, Colo.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Hurricane Hugo, 1989.,
  • Disaster relief -- South Carolina -- Case studies.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Claire B. Rubin and Roy Popkin.
    SeriesNatural hazard research working paper -- no. 69., Natural hazard research working paper -- 69.
    ContributionsPopkin, Roy., University of Colorado, Boulder. Natural Hazards Research and Applications Information Center.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvii, 92 p. :
    Number of Pages92
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17643697M

    The hurricane season had a total of 11 named tropical cyclones of which 7 attained hurricane strength. Hurricane Hugo, a Category 4 hurricane at landfall, was a classic Cape Verde-type hurricane that devastated the Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, and South and North Carolina.. Developing from a cluster of thunderstorms off the coast of Africa on September 9, , Hugo steadily intensified. This report describes how, in the aftermath of Hurricane Hugo, the South Carolina Department of Mental Health activated its Emergency Preparedness Plan to assist mental health centers and their staff in providing crisis counseling services to the general public. The first section explains the history and structure of the involvement by the Department in emergency preparedness planning since Author: Nancy C. Carter.

    After Hurricane Hugo ripped through South Carolina in , U.S. Senator Ernest “Fritz” Hollings called fema “the sorriest bunch of bureaucratic jackasses I’ve ever known.” When disasters struck California the following year, Representative Norman Y. Mineta claimed that fema “could screw up a two-car parade.”.   Rubin, Claire and Roy Popkin. “Disaster Recovery After Hurricane Hugo in SouthCarolina.” Natural Hazard Research Working Paper #69, University of Colorado, JanuarySchmitt, Eric. “Big What If: How Hugo Might Hit L.I.” The New York Times, February9, “Seven Bold Lessons From Hugo.” The Miami Herald, Septem

    The recovery from last year's devastating floods may have helped South Carolina stave off a slowdown in job growth, according to a new study by University of South Carolina researchers. Hurricane Evacuation Routes: South Carolina Coast Disaster Plus has over three decades of experience with Hurricanes. From Hugo to Charley, Gaston through Hanna, the 24/7 team at Disaster Plus is always on-call to assist the Lowcountry with the disaster recovery process from hurricanes, tropical storms, and other natural disasters.


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Disaster recovery after Hurricane Hugo in South Carolina by Claire B. Rubin Download PDF EPUB FB2

Disaster recovery after Hurricane Hugo in South Carolina (Online) (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Claire B Rubin; Roy Popkin.

Disaster Recovery After Hurricane Hugo in South Carolina/Wp69 by Popkin (Author) ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important.

ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. Disaster recovery after Hurricane Hugo in South Carolina (Working paper) Unknown Binding – January 1, Disaster recovery after Hurricane Hugo in South Carolina book Claire B Rubin (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Author: Claire B Rubin. Hurricane force winds of up to mph extended miles northeast and 50 miles south. Hugo crashed ashore in Charleston, South Carolina just after midnight, bringing with it powerful winds and vicious storm surges.

It was the strongest storm to hit the U.S. since Camille in and the worst to hit South Carolina since Disaster mitigation and recovery: a study of Hurricane Hugo’s effect on South Carolina. View/ Open. ROPER-THESISpdf (Mb) Date Author.

Roper, Vance Andrew Lewis. Share Facebook Twitter LinkedIn. Metadata Show full item record. : Vance Andrew Lewis Roper. If and when individual assistance money is approved for this disaster, it will be displayed here. Information is updated every 24 hours. If and when public assistance obligated dollar information is available for this disaster, it will be displayed here.

Information is updated every 24 hours. Learn. Hurricane Hugo rushed ashore near midnight on Sept.carrying a blow so staggering the mammoth storm still generates talk in South Carolina and North Carolina almost 30 Author: Sammy Fretwell.

Hurricane Hugo was a powerful Cape Verde hurricane that caused widespread damage and loss of life in Guadeloupe, Saint Croix, St. Thomas, Puerto Rico, and the Southeast United formed over the eastern Atlantic near the Cape Verde Islands on September 9, Hugo moved thousands of miles across the Atlantic, rapidly strengthening to briefly attain Category 5 hurricane strength on its Damage: $ billion ( USD).

Hurricane Hugo, which caused approximately $10 billion in damage, had been the costliest hurricane to strike the United States before Andrew three years later in Hugo was, in some ways, two hurricanes in one.

From September 17 throit passed through the U.S. Virgin Islands and. Whenever a major earthquake strikes or a hurricane unleashes its fury, the devastating results fill our television screens and newspapers.

Mary C. Comerio is interested in what happens in the weeks and months after such disasters, particularly in the recovery of damaged h case studies of six recent urban disasters--Hurricane Hugo in South Carolina, Hurricane Andrew in Florida.

South Carolina Severe Storms, Tornadoes, And Straight-line Winds (DR) Incident period: Ap to Ap Major Disaster Declaration declared on   The storm l people in the state homeless,temporarily unemployed state residents seeking disaster assistance. Many were without power for two weeks or more.

These were the conditions confronting Charleston residents after Hurricane Hugo passed through on the night of Septemon its way to. South Carolina Disaster Recovery Office, Columbia, South Carolina.

likes. The South Carolina Disaster Recovery Office is dedicated to helping SC rebuild strong communities in areas affected by 3/5(4). South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control For general questions about COVID, the DHEC Care Line is here to help.

Call Call Staff are answering calls from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. seven days a week. Pursuant to a congressional request, GAO reviewed: (1) the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA) efforts to provide temporary housing assistance to South Carolina victims of the September Hurricane Hugo; (2) South Carolina counties' emergency management officials' responses to a disaster assistance survey; and (3) cost-sharing arrangements between FEMA and state and local.

The North Carolina Disaster Recovery Guide compiles information from all of the agencies, programs, and services involved in the long-term recovery from a disaster. This guide will aid any government or community leader involved in managing, organizing, or leading disaster recovery efforts.

Disaster Recovery After Hurricane Hugo in South Carolina/Wp69 Popkin / Paperback / Published Our Price: $ (Special Order) Eye of a Hurricane: Stories Ruthann Robson / Hardcover / Published Our Price: $ (Back Ordered).

According to the NCEOP recovery from a hurricane can begin three days prior to landfall. The section breaks tasks down by checklist from three days out to a week after the hurricane strikes. The North Carolina Disaster Recovery Guide covers the agencies and programs that are involved at the state level in disaster recovery.

On SeptemHurricane Hugo struck the coast of South Carolina near Charleston with sustained winds of miles per hour. The storm moved northwest toward Rock Hill and exited the State with winds still at or near hurricane strength. Hugo has since been widely acknowledged as the greatest single forest disaster in the State’s by:.

Being able to get restaurants up and running in the aftermath of a disaster is the sole function of the jump team, which was designed 30 years ago after Category 4 .North Carolina residents who suffered losses and damage as a result of Hurricane Matthew can get information about disaster assistance at Disaster Recovery Centers (DRC).

Representatives from North Carolina Emergency Management, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and U.S.

Small Business Administration (SBA), are at the centers to.Whenever a major earthquake strikes or a hurricane unleashes its fury, the devastating results fill our television screens and newspapers.

Mary C. Comerio is interested in what happens in the weeks and months after such disasters, particularly in the recovery of damaged h case studies of six recent urban disasters—Hurricane Hugo in South Carolina, Hurricane Andrew in Florida.